Flint Farmer's Market


Scope and Philosophy

Organization

Design Details

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Concept

In June 2014 the city’s Farmer's Market moved from its old riverside location to a much larger and centrally located structure. This building also houses a children’s medical clinic, event spaces, a community kitchen, and the Flint Food Works, a culinary incubator for local businesses. Also, located nearby, are the MSU College of Human Medicine and a new senior care center. Live music is featured on the site lawn on most market days, and special events are offered throughout the summer.


History

The Flint Farmer's Market was moved to several different locations during the twentieth century. A major building for this purpose was constructed on the banks of the Flint River just northeast of downtown in 1940. This structure served the public until 2014, when the Flint Journal newspaper vacated its First Street printing facility, an architecturally unique structure erected in 2004. The market was then moved to this location. It is one block away from a central bus hub accessible from many routes.



Photo ©  Michigan Municipal League, Flint Farmer's Market

The Farmer's Market

The year-round public market has 50 vendors inside the building, including produce vendors, a meat market, poultry, breads and baked goods, cheese, a wine shop, specialty food products and a cafe. It also has two resident chefs to assist customers. On the outside, from May through October, the market has twenty five produce and flower vendors, and on Saturdays, fifteen to twenty art and craft vendors are also outside.


Photo ©  Hurley Medical Clinic,
Flint Farmer's Market Interior

Photo ©  Michigan Municipal League,
Flint Farmer's Market Close-up

The Hurley Children’s Center

The Hurley Children’s Center was created by Hurley Children’s Hospital in partnership with the Uptown Reinvestment Corporation, which manages the Flint Farmers’ Market, and the Michigan State University (MSU) College of Human Medicine, whose students will have opportunities to complete a residency at the center. The center seeks to promote a culture of health — not just by providing state-of-the-art of pediatric care, but also by helping families add fresh, local food to their tables.


Occupying more than 10,000 square feet on the market’s second floor, the center offers both general and specialty pediatric care, including cardiology, neurology and genetics. The center’s bright colors and kid-focused design help to create a fun and welcoming environment for the area’s youngest residents and their families. An innovative approach of the center is to have doctors write “prescriptions” for more healthy fruits and vegetables. Families are then able to go downstairs to get those items at the Farmers’ Market.


Photo ©  Hurley Medical Clinic, Children's center

The Flint Food Works

The Flint Food Works culinary incubator program is specifically geared for the budding food entrepreneur. Taking a food product from concept to market is no easy task. One of the most insurmountable obstacles in that endeavor can be the high cost of setting up a commercial kitchen. That's where the Flint Food Works Culinary Incubator program steps in. Our goal is to help you develop your food business in a safe, supportive environment. Our goal is to help you succeed with access to commercial, licensed kitchen facilities and equipment in a reduced risk.


Flint Food Works is a unique venture in Genesee County with the goal of providing a facility for food-based businesses to establish a product, perfect their recipe, and develop a business model that will help them grow. As a culinary business incubator our mission is to help entrepreneurs get off the ground floor and literally take a product from the field to the market. For Flint to continue its progress towards becoming a diverse, exciting and prosperous place to live we need local businesses to thrive and local entrepreneurs to bring their passion to our community. And that is where Flint Food Works comes in.


Program of All-Inclusive Care (PACE) Center for the Elderly

Just to the east of the market, a formerly vacant building has been developed into the Program of All-Inclusive Care (PACE) Center for the Elderly. This center, a subsidiary of Genesys Hospital targets the unique health care needs of area senior citizens. It offers primary care, physical and occupational therapy, meals, nutrition counseling, social services, transportation and an array of other services to participants in the program. The center employs 70 workers, and it can serve a maximum of about 225 individuals daily


The center program allows elderly adults to stay living at home with a spouse, child or by themselves while receiving care at the facility during the day It takes aproactive approach to their health care, instead of waiting for health problems to arise that may result in emergency care.


Photo ©  Flint Pace Center,

Capitol Theater

The Capitol Theatre Building is a cinema and concert hall located just to the southeast of the market. It opened in 1928 and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. It was designed by John Eberson, an architect known for his designs of theaters with atmospheric themes. The Capitol was designed to evoke images of Renaissance Italy.


After being used as a movie theater for years, the building had been sitting vacant for nearly two decades. On October 21, 2015, it was announced that Uptown Reinvestment Corp. will partner with The Whiting Auditorium in Flint and its governing body to relaunch the Capitol Theatre. The restoration is planned to be completed by 2017. Uptown will handle the redevelopment and restoration, and The Whiting will manage operations, programming and marketing. In addition to the performance seating, the facility will include 25,000 square feet of refurbished office and retail space. The restored theater is intended to be a "first-class music and performing arts venue" for concerts, plays and other performances.



Photo ©  Wikipedia: Flint Capitol Theatre, Author: kennethaw88

Disclaimer

This website is not a professional guide, but an editing of existing referenced material for educational purposes. The website author assumes no responsibility for any problems resulting from using the material presented in this website.


Sources:

American Planning Association: Flint Farmers' Market

Faith in Flint: PACE Center

Flint Food Works

Hurley Children's Center

Project for Public Spaces: A Good Move for Flint

Wikipedia: Flint Capitol Theater